Conceptual cells

Choice of Stem Cells Can Improve Therapeutic Potential

Stem cell therapy could represent an effective and comprehensive approach to treating ALS. Stefania Corti, M.D., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Neurology at the University of Milan, and her colleagues set out to find ways to improve stem cell therapy. Their work, supported by The ALS Association, was published on June 6, 2016 in the journal Human Molecular Genetics.

Stem cells are cells that are capable of developing into different cell types, including neurons (brain cells) and glia (brain support cells). Not all stem cells are the same and choosing stem cell populations with specific desirable properties could in fact improve the therapeutic potential of stem cell therapy.

neurocollaborative

The Neuro Collaborative: An Engine for ALS Therapeutics

In 2014, The ALS Association Golden West Chapter and patient advocate Jim Barber partnered to build the Neuro Collaborative concept. That year, following the amazing outpouring of support from the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge, The ALS Association committed $5 million dollars to the project. With additional help from The ALS Association Orange County and Wisconsin Chapters, the Neuro Collaborative has become an engine for ALS therapeutics. Learn more about the progress of each partner in the Neuro Collaborative below.

Early development of potential therapeutics is a major bottleneck in ALS therapy development. Eliminating this bottleneck is a significant opportunity for accelerating new treatments. That’s where the Neuro Collaborative comes in.

The Neuro Collaborative is a partnership between three leading laboratories in California: Clive Svendsen, Ph.D. at Cedars Sinai in Los Angeles; Steven Finkbeiner, M.D., Ph.D. at Gladstone Institutes, affiliated with University of California San Francisco; and Don Cleveland, Ph.D. at University of California San Diego.

The goal of the Collaborative is to establish and invest in a leading team of experts to efficiently advance ALS drug development together with industry partners. This complements other programs including the Drug Development Contract Program in the TREATâ„¢ ALS portfolio investing in academic and industry partnerships. This synergetic model leverages open dialogue and the scientific expertise of leading researchers to achieve therapeutic milestones as quickly as possible. It also reduces risk in the drug discovery process and attracts pharmaceutical companies to invest in drug development and clinical trials for ALS. With success, potential therapies for ALS will move more quickly than ever toward FDA approval and the open market.