Meet Jorge Gomez-Deza: A 2018 Milton Safenowitz Postdoctoral Fellow

Our Milton Safenowitz Postdoctoral Fellowship Program continues to support young scientists and is the only program of its kind specifically funding early ALS postdoctoral fellows.

The awards were founded in memory of Mr. Safenowitz by the Safenowitz family – through The ALS Association Greater New York Chapter. The program encourages young scientists to enter and, importantly, to remain in the ALS field.

We are proud that 76 percent of the postdoctoral fellows we fund go on to start their own labs to continue studying ALS and mentor other young ALS researchers. The rest of our Safenowitz fellowship program graduates go on to careers in the biomedical industry, nonprofits, and medical writing, with many still staying in the ALS space.

This year, we are supporting five new postdoctoral fellows out of a highly competitive applicant pool. Over the next few weeks, we will highlight each fellow – their dedication and unique contributions to ALS research, as well as their interests outside of the lab.

We recently talked with Dr. Jorge Gomez-Deza with the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD)/National Institutes of Health (NIH) to learn about his unique research project, which has the ultimate goal of identifying a druggable target that prevents neuronal death.

Continue reading Meet Jorge Gomez-Deza: A 2018 Milton Safenowitz Postdoctoral Fellow

FAQ: Biogen is Now Enrolling in Phase 3 VALOR Clinical Trial to Test Safety and Efficacy of Tofersen

Biogen has initiated a phase 3 clinical trial evaluating tofersen (previously called BIIB067), an antisense oligonucleotide (ASO), a type of antisense drug, targeting superoxide dismutase (SOD1), for the potential treatment of ALS. The trial is now enrolling and aims to enroll approximately 60 people with SOD1 ALS

At this week’s 2019 American Academy of Neurology (AAN) Annual Meeting in Philadelphia, Biogen presented promising results of their phase 1/2 SOD1-ALS trial (tofersen – BIIB067). They were encouraged by the initial findings of the study, so they are moving into a larger phase 3 trial to further test the safety and efficacy of tofersen. While this news is promising, it is important to note that the drug (tofersen) is still experimental.

Continue reading FAQ: Biogen is Now Enrolling in Phase 3 VALOR Clinical Trial to Test Safety and Efficacy of Tofersen

Revised ALS Clinical Trials Consensus Guidelines Modernize Trial Practices

The ALS Association is proud to be a longtime supporter of the Airlie House ALS Clinical Trials Consensus Guidelines, which have been revised and published in Neurology, the most widely read and highly cited peer-reviewed neurology journal.

The goal of the Guidelines is to improve research to test cures for ALS. We believe they will pave the way to decrease clinical trial burden for people with ALS and help contribute innovative designs to clinical trials.

Continue reading Revised ALS Clinical Trials Consensus Guidelines Modernize Trial Practices

Biogen to Present Promising Results of Phase 1/2 Trial of Antisense Targeting SOD1

Next week at the American Academy of Neurology Meeting (AAN) in Philadelphia, Biogen will present promising results of the phase 1/2 study of its newly named investigational therapy tofersen (previously BIIB067), which is now enrolling in a phase 3 trial. Tofersen is an antisense oligonucleotide (ASO), a type of designer DNA drug, targeting SOD1.

The ALS Association is proud to be the first funder of antisense technology.  Our support   dates back to 2004, when antisense was just an idea in Dr. Don Cleveland’s lab at University of California San Diego (UCSD). This new potential treatment targets the second most common cause of inherited ALS, mutations in the SOD1 gene.

Continue reading Biogen to Present Promising Results of Phase 1/2 Trial of Antisense Targeting SOD1

Meet Andrei Ursu: A 2018 Milton Safenowitz Postdoctoral Fellow

Our Milton Safenowitz Postdoctoral Fellowship Program continues to support young scientists and is the only program of its kind specifically funding early ALS postdoctoral fellows.

The awards were founded in memory of Mr. Safenowitz by the Safenowitz family – through The ALS Association Greater New York Chapter. The program encourages young scientists to enter and, importantly, to remain in the ALS field.

We are proud that 76 percent of the postdoctoral fellows we fund go on to start their own labs to continue studying ALS and mentor other young ALS researchers. The rest of our Safenowitz fellowship program graduates go on to careers in the biomedical industry, nonprofits, and medical writing, with many still staying in the ALS space.

This year, we are supporting five new postdoctoral fellows out of a highly competitive applicant pool. Over the next few weeks, we will highlight each fellow – their dedication and unique contributions to ALS research, as well as their interests outside of the lab.

We recently talked with Dr. Andrei Ursu from The Scripps Research Institute (Florida Campus) to learn about his unique research project focused on targeting the most common form of genetically inherited ALS, known as c9ALS, with rationally designed lead medicines.

Continue reading Meet Andrei Ursu: A 2018 Milton Safenowitz Postdoctoral Fellow

Meet Alyssa Coyne: A 2018 Milton Safenowitz Postdoctoral Fellow

Our Milton Safenowitz Postdoctoral Fellowship Program continues to support young scientists and is the only program of its kind specifically funding early ALS postdoctoral fellows.

The awards were founded in memory of Mr. Safenowitz by the Safenowitz family – through The ALS Association Greater New York Chapter. The program encourages young scientists to enter and, importantly, to remain in the ALS field.

We are proud that 76 percent of the postdoctoral fellows we fund go on to start their own labs to continue studying ALS and mentor other young ALS researchers. The rest of our Safenowitz fellowship program graduates go on to careers in the biomedical industry, nonprofits, and medical writing, with many still staying in the ALS space.

This year, we are supporting five new postdoctoral fellows out of a highly competitive applicant pool. Over the next few weeks, we will highlight each fellow – their dedication and unique contributions to ALS research, as well as their interests outside of the lab.

We recently talked with Dr. Alyssa Coyne from Johns Hopkins University to learn about her unique research project focused on understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying the most common form of familial ALS.

Continue reading Meet Alyssa Coyne: A 2018 Milton Safenowitz Postdoctoral Fellow

Meet Edward Barbieri: A 2018 Milton Safenowitz Postdoctoral Fellow

Our Milton Safenowitz Postdoctoral Fellowship Program continues to support young scientists and is the only program of its kind specifically funding early ALS postdoctoral fellows.

The awards were founded in memory of Mr. Safenowitz by the Safenowitz family – through The ALS Association Greater New York Chapter. The program encourages young scientists to enter and, importantly, to remain in the ALS field.

We are proud that 76 percent of the postdoctoral fellows we fund go on to start their own labs to continue studying ALS and mentor other young ALS researchers. The rest of our Safenowitz fellowship program graduates go on to careers in the biomedical industry, nonprofits, and medical writing, with many still staying in the ALS space.

This year, we are supporting five new postdoctoral fellows out of a highly competitive applicant pool. Over the next few weeks, we will highlight each fellow – their dedication and unique contributions to ALS research, as well as their interests outside of the lab.

We recently talked with Dr. Edward Barbieri from the University of Pennsylvania to learn about his unique research project aimed at identify particular networks of chaperones that can reverse the toxic effects of ALS-associated proteins in cells.

Continue reading Meet Edward Barbieri: A 2018 Milton Safenowitz Postdoctoral Fellow